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Roger Federer: We shouldn’t forget the players who suffer from mental health problems

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20 time Grand Slam champion Roger Federer has said it is important not to underestimate the importance of mental health in tennis, in a recent interview where he was helping raise funds for Brazil in the current crisis.

Roger Federer says we need to show support to each other
During his interview, Federer commented, “We shouldn’t forget the players who suffer from mental health problems.

It is important that we do not underestimate the importance of mental health in our sport. It’s very unusual. We haven’t seen this in many many years. It isn’t easy [to deal with]. It is important that we do not underestimate the importance of mental health in our sport.

We need to show support to each other. Maybe it’s a fresh start that people and the world needs”. Several players have spoken about the importance of mental fitness in recent times, especially after the lockdown was announced in March due to the global pandemic.

The men’s ATP Tour has taken some steps to address the issue in recent weeks. These include collaborating with ‘Sporting Chance’ to open a 24-hour hotline that players can call and speak to therapists specifically trained to deal with athletes; providing players with access to ‘Headspace’, an online company that provides content on meditation, mindfulness, sleep behaviour and training methods; and access to the ‘Coursera’ learning platform where over 4,200 online courses are offered on a wide variety of subjects.

Roger Federer is considered the Greatest Player of all Time in men’s tennis by many. He has won 20 Grand Slam singles titles—the most in history for a male player—and has held the world No. 1 spot in the world for a record total of 310 weeks (including a record 237 consecutive weeks).

He was also the year-end No. 1 five times. Federer has won a record eight Wimbledon singles titles, six Australian Open titles, five US Open titles, and one French Open title. He is one of eight men to have achieved a Career Grand Slam.

He has won 103 career titles, the second most in the Open Era, and was a member of Switzerland’s winning Davis Cup team in 2014. At the 2008 Olympic Games, Federer won the gold medal in doubles along with Stan Wawrinka.

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Novak Djokovic says he regrets his failure to win at the US Open or Roland Garros

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“The US Open disqualification notwithstanding, I have only lost one match all season and I’ve played some of the best tennis of my life”

Novak Djokovic says he regrets the failure to win either the US or French Opens, despite playing some of the best tennis of his life in 2020.

Having won an eighth Australian Open in January, Djokovic was disqualified at the US Open after inadvertently hitting a line judge in the neck with a petulant swipe of the ball during his fourth-round clash with Pablo Carreno Busta.

He was then blown away by world No 2 Rafael Nadal in the final of the re-arranged French Open in October.

Djokovic remains on 17 Grand Slam titles while Nadal and Federer are on 20 each after the Spaniard clinched a record-extending 13th Roland Garros title.

“There is a lingering regret that I didn’t win either the US Open or the Roland Garros this year,” Djokovic told reporters at his tennis academy in downtown Belgrade by the Danube river.

“I was in outstanding form at both events but having reached the French Open final, I was beaten by a player who was much better on the day.

“I was below par and that’s it. As far as the US Open is concerned, I got myself into an unfortunate situation and was disqualified, but I won several other big tournaments.

“The US Open disqualification notwithstanding, I have only lost one match all season and I’ve played some of the best tennis of my life.”

Djokovic dismissed suggestions he was under intense pressure to overhaul Nadal and Federer in their three-way race to become the greatest male player of all time.

“Pressure has been a part of my life for a long time and I’ve learned how to deal with it,” he said.

“It comes with the territory if you are a top-level athlete and it can also galvanise you. You take physical and mental knocks along the way but it’s all part of the learning curve.

“If I retired now I’d be happy with everything I have achieved but I still enjoy competing and every tournament I enter gives me so much motivation and joy.”

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